3 Ways to Lift Tesla with QuickJack


3 Ways to Lift Tesla with QuickJack

Tuesday, January 8, 2019
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Tesla vehicles come with their own set of joys and challenges, especially where upkeep is concerned. When it comes time for maintenance or detailing on a Tesla, you might find it difficult to lift these vehicles with a car lift. This is due to the fact that Teslas, not to mention other EVs, feature very long wheelbases. Not every lift is capable of reaching as far as necessary, and that includes many low-rise and mid-rise lifts. If you have a low ceiling that makes it impossible to install a full-service two-post lift, you might begin to feel very restricted in your lifting options. Luckily, QuickJack offers safe, simple solutions for your lifting woes. Here are several ways to lift a Tesla with QuickJack. Remember: Our ultimate goal is to provide a solution that helps you work smarter, not harder.

QuickJack BL-6000XLT with Tesla
QuickJack BL-6000XLT with Tesla

Add SLX Extension Kit to QuickJack

If you already own a BL-5000SLX or BL-7000SLX portable car lift, you can start lifting Tesla Model S and Model 3 cars for less than $200. All you need is the SLX frame extension kit, a magnificent plug-and-play tool that immediately adds six inches of reach to your QuickJack. The extra length essentially converts your SLX standard-length frames into EXT extended-length frames. This is great for reaching the lift points on the Model 3, but if you’re lifting a Model S, there’s still one more required step.

The Model S has one of the longest factory lift point spreads of any sedan (or any passenger car, for that matter). The SLX frames on their own aren’t long enough to lift a Tesla. To resolve this issue, simply attach the extension frames to your QuickJack frames and rotate them sideways. This is perfectly safe because Tesla vehicles have close to a 50/50 weight distribution.

No matter what vehicle you’re lifting or the orientation of the QuickJack frames, make sure the QuickJack rubber blocks fully contact the vehicle’s factory lift points. Be VERY CAREFUL to NEVER lift an EV from any point that isn’t the factory-intended lift point, as the lift points are located very close to the highly sensitive battery.

Start with EXT Series QuickJack Frames

If you run an auto detailing shop or body shop that sees a lot of Teslas and other long-wheelbase vehicles, you might decide to bypass the extension frame kit by starting out with an extended-length EXT series QuickJack. If you’re lifting a Model 3, an EXT lift will work as generally recommended, and if you’re lifting a Model S, simply rotate those frames sideways. Impression Auto Salon, featured below, is one of the first professional detailers we know of to use this method to detail Teslas. The “sideways QuickJack” method appears to do very well for business!

Tesla being detailed at Impression Auto Salon
Tesla being detailed at Impression Auto Salon

Get the BL-6000XLT portable car lift

The BL-6000XLT offers what is arguably the most convenient way to lift a Tesla Model S. We designed the XLT car lift specifically for long-wheelbase vehicles. This specialty lift does well in detailing studios and auto shops that service extended-length crew cabs, EVs and other hard-to-lift vehicles. If you are lifting a Model S, the BL-6000XLT will be easier to use than our other portable car lift models because you won’t have to turn the frames sideways.

A few years ago, EV vehicles like the Tesla Model S were difficult to lift with QuickJack. Luckily, most QuickJack owners are now able to upgrade their setups for less than $200 and lift these tricky vehicles. Our sideways workaround method is very safe and effective, but if you work on these cars a lot, we recommended picking up the BL-6000XLT.