What is the Difference between QuickJack and other car lifts?


What is the Difference between QuickJack and other car lifts?

Tuesday, August 2, 2016
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There are many different car lift options on the market: two-post lifts, four-post lifts, portable car lifts, alignment lifts, etc. Some are intended for commercial use, while others can be conveniently operated in most small business or home garages. QuickJack is entirely different. Its main features are its portability and ease-of-use, and it sets itself apart from other low-rise lifts because it offers open undercarriage access. If you’re not familiar with QuickJack or portable lift options in general, we’ll break down the difference between the QuickJack, two-post lifts and four-post lifts.

QuickJack Portable Car Lift

QuickJack Portable Car JackInvented in 2013, QuickJack was designed to revolutionize the way home buyers view portable car lifts. While QuickJack can certainly be used in commercial garages, its main purpose is to provide automotive hobbyists and home buyers with an affordable, premium-quality portable car lift that can be stowed, set up and utilized with no hassle. Three models are offered with weight capacities of 3500, 5000 and 7000 lbs.

Like two-post lifts, QuickJack engages the frame of your vehicle at your vehicle’s designated lift points. It rises to a maximum height of approximately 21” off the ground (with stackable rubber blocks) and sits a mere 3” above the ground when fully collapsed (3.5″ for the 7000 model). Additionally, QuickJack takes only 30 seconds to fully rise, and it does it all with the simple touch of a button on the pendant remote control. Safety locks automatically engage at the mid and max levels. No pumps, mechanical cranks or jack stands necessary. Urethane wheels let you roll it around the garage and make it easy to transport the frames to and from the track. In fact, racers love the QuickJack because it’s so portable and easy to maneuver around tight spaces.

Regardless of where you set up your car lift, QuickJack is safer and more stable than jack stands and doesn’t feature crossbeams that interfere with your work. so think of QuickJack like a safer, more advanced and user-friendly car jack/stand combination, making it the perfect portable car lift. As an added bonus, QuickJack is the perfect tool for washing and detailing your car, light-duty truck or SUV. Watch the video below to see what we mean.

Summary: If you want a portable car lift that emphasizes safety and ease-of-use, QuickJack is perfect for you.

Pros:

  •  Automatic safety locks—safer than traditional jacks/stands
  •  Remote push-button control
  •  Open-center design
  •  3″ collapsible frame
  •  30 seconds to reach 20″ max rise
  •  Constructed with high-grade 14-gauge steel
  •  Equal or higher lifting capacity compared to other portable car lifts

Cons:

  • Less rise than two/four-post lifts

Two-post lifts

BendPak two-post car liftStill the staple car lift of the commercial automotive industry, two-post lifts offer excellent undercarriage access and can rise high enough to operate while sitting comfortably or standing. Arms extend from each post that branch out and engage the right and left lifting points on the front and back of your vehicle frame. It’s vital to know where the lifting points are located on your vehicle. Given the increased size and thickness of the support beams (compared to QuickJack), as well as the increased support power of the arms, two-post lifts can handle more weight than the smaller, more portable QuickJack. BendPak offers two-posts lifts with weight capacities between 9,000-18,000 lbs. and max rises between 69-72”.

Two-post and four-post lifts are much bulkier than QuickJack, and they are intended to be permanent fixtures that remain bolted into the ground. They are more expensive and therefore less ideal for the casual automotive hobbyist, but anyone with enough garage space and an inclination to do a lot of work on cars might find one worth the investment. This lift type is serious equipment—heights range from 113-192”.

Summary: The most commonly used professional car lift. Can be used in spacious home garages that are able to accommodate the size of professional equipment.

Pros:

  •  Excellent undercarriage access for most repairs
  •  More rise than portable car lifts
  •  Same lift type used by most professional auto/body shops
  •  Higher lift capacity than portable car lifts

Cons:

  • Bulky, cannot be stowed away
  • More expensive than QuickJack
  • Requires more space to install and operate

Four-post lifts

BendPak four-post lift with two carsLike QuickJack and two-post lifts, four-post lifts offer complete undercarriage access. The four-post lift is unique, however, because your vehicle’s wheels rest on a lift platform. Since the frame is not engaged, getting cars on and off the lift is as easy as driving over a platform, eliminating the risk of missing a lifting point and damaging the vehicle frame. Four-post lifts can also be used as parking lifts. Because they require four posts to be bolted firmly to the ground, they are capable lifting almost any automotive vehicle. BendPak offers four-post lifts with lifting capacities between 7,000-40,000 lbs. These lifts are necessary for the most heavy-duty vehicles, such as commercial transport vehicles and trucks. Rolling bridge jacks can be used to elevate wheels to perform wheel service.

Summary: Automotive hobbyists and commercial shop owners may enjoy this lift’s ability to handle nearly any weight load, as well as the added benefit that this lift doubles as a parking lift.

Pros:

  •  Heavy-duty models are capable of handling incredible loads
  •  Easy to drive on/off lifting platform
  •  Complete undercarriage access
  •  Doubles as parking lift

Cons:

  • Larger and bulkier than two-post lifts
  • Generally the most expensive option
  • Wheel service requires separate bridge jack